Author Topic: 61- 62 eldorados  (Read 1377 times)

Offline rare eldorado

61- 62 eldorados
« on: July 05, 2017, 04:33:10 PM »
hello Members In looking at the internet I have counted 32,,, 61 -62 Eldorados  for sale in Hemmings trader on line and others .Great news that there are at least 100 left in great condition However some prices have really became high .Has anyone have a higher account of remaining eldos ?Could it be that many people are leaving the hobby because of age health,, issues ,,or dying and the familys  do not want collector cars or have no interest in them ?Could this be the end of the hobby? Do any members have any comments on the hobby of what they have found?

Offline Clewisiii

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Re: 61- 62 eldorados
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2017, 05:18:47 PM »
That is my opinion. Only an opinion.  Those guys hoarding 5 to 10 cars in their late 60s early 70s. Will all be unloaded in the same decade. It is not just that people are not into classic cars.  They are not into driving. My little brother did not get his license till 22
"My interest is in the future because I am going to spend the rest of my life there."
Charles Kettering

Offline Perk2

Re: 61- 62 eldorados
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2017, 09:54:22 PM »
Plenty of reasons, and those are all very reasonable ... I know they will need to pry The Pastry from my cold dead hands though  :)
Which hopefully won't be for a while yet  8)
"Get busy living, or get busy dying!"

Offline StevenTuck

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Re: 61- 62 eldorados
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2017, 05:12:59 AM »
In my opinion, car collecting will die a slow death. The youth of today do not have a connection to a car like we did. We couldn't wait to get our license to drive. It was our ticket to freedom. The youth of today's ticket to freedom is a cell phone / mobile device. Honestly there will always be those who collect cars similar to those who collect different things but it will be nothing like today. All these vehicle auction companies will disappear because the volume of selling / buying will not support their business. Additionally, the cars of today will not survive the salvage yards. Their electronics will be the first to go then the cars themselves. Vehicles are more disposable than ever. I guess only time will tell.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 05:53:28 AM by StevenTuck »
Steven M. Tuck CLC#16507
1962 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz
http://bit.ly/1NfPNHE
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Offline Clewisiii

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"My interest is in the future because I am going to spend the rest of my life there."
Charles Kettering

Offline Sevillian

Re: 61- 62 eldorados
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2017, 03:13:46 AM »
When we can't buy gas, ditch the engine and convert to electric.  There's already a firm in San Diego doing that for old cars.  Wheeler Dealers  had it done to a sports car in one episode not to long ago.  You'll have quite a few years to save up for it.     
David Greenburg
1960 Eldorado Seville
1961 Fleetwood 60 Special
CLC #3830

Offline Peter.1961

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Re: 61- 62 eldorados
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2017, 06:40:08 AM »
As a person of a younger generation (I'm 35) I'm not sure the hobby will die or that quickly. I certainly plan to hold on to my two cars for the next 40 years :)

Maybe the shape of the hobby will change, Bifurcating into super pristine investment collections and simpler cars used as drivers, with the middle ground of meticulous private backyard restorations becoming fewer ... But I'm quote sure the interest in classic cars will live on in some way
“If everything seems under control, you’re just not going fast enough” -- Mario Andretti

Offline Clewisiii

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Re: 61- 62 eldorados
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2017, 08:43:04 AM »
Each year there is an increase in the number of restored cars. 
Each year there are fewer cars that are a candidate for restoration.

The middle of the road cars become more valuable for their parts then they are as complete cars.

This situation will just throw the entire supply and demand economics off.

"My interest is in the future because I am going to spend the rest of my life there."
Charles Kettering

Offline FINCADI

Re: 61- 62 eldorados
« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2017, 12:28:31 AM »
I have also wondered about the future of the collector car hobby, but I don't believe it will disappear.  I am 56 and I cannot imagine not enjoying collecting cars and attending car shows for as long as I am able, but my kids could care less about either.   Here is an interesting observance I made just recently at a car show earlier this month. My 61' Cadillac Coupe deVille was parked in line with a 56' Ford Crown Victoria, 57' Ford Thunderbird convertible, 63' Ford Fairlane, 58' Mercury Turnpike Cruiser, 62' Chevy Impala and a 2016 Ford Focus. Yep that's right, a 2016 Ford Focus. All of the "classic" cars in that line up are owned by collectors in their 50's, 60's and 70's, while the Ford Focus was owned by a young couple that I would guess was in their early to mid 20's.  For the life of me I could not understand why anyone would enter a new Ford Focus in a car show, but to them that car held as much meaning to them as ours did to each of us. I soon observed what possibly may be a glimpse of the future of car collecting. Numerous times when a younger person (20's) would walk by that line of cars they would slip right by the beautiful classic cars with little more than a glimpse, and an occasional comment on how big the trunks were, and then go all goo goo eyed over the 2016 Ford Focus, perhaps because it had a stereo system in it that I am sure when turned up could have been heard two states away.  In all honesty I cannot imagine any of the new cars I drive today ever being collectible and or in a car show in the future as to me they are boring, plastic clones of each other that seem to self destruct after the warranty expires, but I am pretty sure that the original owners of our classic cars never envisioned them as future collectibles at the time. Perhaps to the younger generation our daily drivers will someday be something they find collectible, or at least stereo worthy.  In all seriousness I think there will always be an interest in collectible cars, they just may not be the same cars that we desire and collect.

Offline Peter.1961

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Re: 61- 62 eldorados
« Reply #9 on: July 18, 2017, 10:01:58 AM »
Interesting discussion. Carl, I think you got a good point on the supply and demand. On the other hand, a showroom restoration from the 80s is now just a 30 year old car ... Maybe it'll go in cycles.

 As to kids / younger guys/gals picking it up, here's my personal experience. I always liked to tinker with stuff, take things apart, and build things that go. I think a lot of kids do. I played with carpentry, hi-fi equipment (rebuilt a 70s light organ in high school), fixed appliances, built computers (commodore, then 286/386). I didn't touch our cars (80s/90s models) since they seemed too complex. I never got interested in classic cars because it all seemed so dry - cars so polished you can't touch them, mileage limits on the insurance, don't go out when it rains, ... Where is the fun in all that?

What got me hooked was when I was 23, had 1,000 dollars in my pocket, bought the coolest car I could find (a 62 series 62 six window ...), And drove the hell out of it. Fixed it with a hammer and duct tape by the road side, changed the alternator in the kragen parking lot, and worked my way up to doing head gaskets at the curb in front of the dorm. That's it, got my hands dirty, and no one telling me what I couldn't do, just the satisfaction of tinkering, ingenuity, and fixing it with my own hands.

I have a hunch that a lot of the older semesters here have similar experience growing up, when classic cars were just old, cheap cars, and you were free to just tinker.

Today many kids just see the shiny shows cars, things you can't use, you can't touch, and it seems full of rules, tedious, not fun.

Now of course I get Carl's point, limited supply, and in effect I ruined a pretty decent restoration candidate because I was just as kid messing with it. But then, it got me hooked, and now 12 years later I'm spending lots of $$$ keeping a car on the road, giving back so to speak.

I think it's also on us to make sure kids see the hobby add the adventure and freedom and tinkering that got us hooked. Or at least, I feel that's my part to play.
“If everything seems under control, you’re just not going fast enough” -- Mario Andretti