Author Topic: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?  (Read 1822 times)

Offline Roger Zimmermann

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #20 on: February 11, 2019, 06:40:05 AM »
The used rear floor was welded in early September 1993. As it came from a 4 door model, the sides had to be cut and specific parts made from scratch.

The "B" pillars are made with thick steel; they could be sandblasted and primed. They are drying here with some other parts. It's good to have some space for such a job!

Offline Roger Zimmermann

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2019, 06:00:59 AM »
As there is no heater in the old barn, the activities during wintertime are very limited. The "B" pillars were back and welded at the end of March 1994. The rear of the body is ready, with the exception of the rear fenders.

It's time to go towards the front. The damages are less important, repairs are nevertheless needed. Rotten sheetmetal was cut away, new parts formed and adjusted. The front floor's support is coming from the same Sedan de Ville; the one from the Biarritz was too rusted.

Next to the sheet metal work, I was also searching for parts as many were either missing or beyond repair. I could buy many parts of good quality by Gene Schacter in Canada. Unfortunately, he left this activity; I am missing him as a good and not expensive supplier.

There is reinforcement at the front "A" pillar between the outer and inner rocker panel. As the original one was no more good, I did another one. I choose to add some length as this place is critical for shaking. Maybe it was not necessary, I did no calculation...

During summertime, I could finish the front floor, replacing rusted areas at the RH and LH front pillar.

Offline Lexi

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #22 on: February 16, 2019, 10:05:11 AM »
Such dedication and craftsmanship. Well done Roger. Clay/Lexi

Offline Roger Zimmermann

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2019, 10:14:11 AM »
Thanks Clay!

Offline Lexi

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2019, 10:21:15 AM »
You are the man Roger, and another one of the "Cadillac Gods"! You are correct in that LOTS of space is required to tackle a job like that. Clay/Lexi

Offline Roger Zimmermann

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2019, 06:40:02 AM »
After the floor was ready, I could weld in place the outside rocker panel. The rear fender is not yet welded on the body; during the work at the front, I put the fenders on the body to spare some space.

During August 1994, the rear compartment was ready and primed. Suddenly, there are less parts lying on the floor. To see them in place is making a good feeling. It's necessary with such a project!

Offline Roger Zimmermann

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2019, 08:24:17 AM »
The panel between the trunk lid and the floor had some rust spots. I had to remove that panel for repair. The same original Biarritz panel was too rusty to be rescued. The LH rear fender is again on the floor; some work was done on it: I could rescue the lower part from the de Ville floor and, with some modifications, weld it to the main fender. It's the reason why the bottom of the fender is white.

About at the same time, I had to cut the lower corner of the windshield. I could get another part from the de Ville to do a proper repair. The windshield in the background was broken, but still needed for the alignment of the "new" lower corner.

Offline Roger Zimmermann

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #27 on: March 01, 2019, 05:45:34 AM »
In July 1995, the rear fenders were ready. It was not an easy task to form the lower part (the one that was eaten by the rust) with a correct flange for the wheel opening. My friend did the RH rear fender, and then he had some trouble with the police and his drinking habits. Therefore, he could not come anymore as he was without a driving license for some months.
Fortunately, I could learn a lot with him and I did the repair for the LH rear fender. As everybody knows, to weld a steel piece in the middle creates a lot of heat with the mandatory distortions. These distortions had to be corrected before the rear fenders were welded on the body; otherwise, some spots could not be reached any more from behind. Those who are familiar with sheet metal know what I'm speaking about.
The second picture shows the LH fender which is ready to be welded on the body. A great moment!


Offline Roger Zimmermann

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #28 on: March 01, 2019, 05:46:47 AM »
To avoid too much dirt on the other cars, I put some clear plastic as a separation between the working space and the storage space. It was not perfect, but good enough.
When the body was repaired, it was time to remove the frame. I had plenty of opportunities to have a good look at it and, fortunately, he was intact. No rust holes, no major damages. At least something very positive.
With a closed car it would have been possible to remove the frame prior to the body work for a better accessibility. However, I'm not so sure as those bodies had a notorious lack of rigidity. Anyway, on a convertible as ill as mine was, to remove the frame would have permit to body to break! Due to space limitation, I had first to push the body & frame on the left of my room (why not to the right? don't ask, I have no answer!)
To separate the frame from the body, I lifted the whole unit as high as I could, removed the about 20 screws and then I began to lower the frame with a floor jack. It takes time, especially when working alone.
The pictures were done in August 1995.

Offline Roger Zimmermann

Re: 1956 Eldo Biarritz: to restore or not?
« Reply #29 on: March 13, 2019, 09:57:30 AM »
Now, body and frame are next to another. By chance, the room is wide enough!

Once the frame was put on side, I could begin to clean the underbody. What an ungrateful job! Even with new pieces welded as well as the ones prepared outside, there was still a large surface not yet touched. As I have no water in that place, I was not the nicest one after a cleaning session. Fortunately, the home drive was no longer than half an hour!
As I wrote earlier, there is no heater in that room. There is a minimum temperature to paint parts with a 2 components product. By chance, I could prime the underbody in October, before it was too cold.
During springtime 1996, the firewall was sealed. The color coat in not far away!